Proxy.sh usher in big changes to their VPN service

Proxy.sh Website

A couple of days ago proxy.sh announced a fairly large overhaul of their service. A quick side note – for those unfamiliar with proxy.sh. As described by the company, proxy.sh is a “reliable provider of anonymous, non-logging and strongly encrypted VPN tunnels” located around the globe.

Because of their transparency and encryption practices, many users take comfort in using the service, and as of August 28th there is just more to love.

The recent update includes a number of welcome changes, the largest of which is probably the third rendition of Safejumper – the company’s OpenVPN client. With Safejumper 3.0 users can expect increased stability and a much more appealing interface. Apart from being free, Safejumper is now completely open source and available for Windows, Mac and Android with Linux and iOS versions still in development.

Proxy.sh Safejumper

The proxy.sh website has also been updated, visitors are now greeted with a fresh interface that brings along a more positive user experience. In 2015, that means that the website is now completely optimized for mobile browsers. And while pretty websites are important – under the hood functionality is what really matters.

Besides making their services more stable, proxy.sh has also stepped up their encryption. As of now, the entire network uses SHA512/RSA4096 standards. Alongside the strong encryption, users now have the option of using multi-hop technology as a paid extra. For the not-so-savvy this means that for an extra $5 per month you will have complete control over both the entry and exit points of your connection.

Extra encryption is provided though ECC, and XOR/TOR obfsproxy scrambling methods. The cherry on top of the anonymity cake is the fact that your password is delivered via a read-once paste link.

As their testament to privacy, proxy.sh has also implemented a system which allows their customers to pay for their subscription anonymously through the token membership option. In essence, this will let users purchase tokens (both from the site or via a 3rd party) that can be used in place of login credentials when using the service. If purchased from a 3rd party, proxy.sh users can expect even greater anonymity as their billing information can no longer be connected to the service.

Proxy.sh Large Logo

Finally, proxy.sh have expanded their “Boost” network to Singapore and Germany. For those unfamiliar, Boost is a package add-on that allows users to access additional VPN nodes hosted on the fastest lines on the Internet. To put it into perspective – Boost nodes have the capacity of up to 50Gbps compared to the 1Gbps you can expect with regular nodes. Another change that comes with this expansion is the fact that the “Boost” package is no longer available on its own and if you want access to it, you can get it either through a “Pro” membership or by purchasing it as an add-on starting at $1.

While this overhaul was a sizable one, proxy.sh has no plans of stopping development. On the contrary, they’re planning to expand and grow even further. In the future, proxy.sh plans to add more nodes and locations, as well as continually improve encryption and stability of their service line.

Avatar

Author: Aleks Bahdanovich

When not writing about the latest tech, this Apple enthusiast enjoys building custom PC's, and designing a more aesthetic web. Using whatever free time is left, Aleks partakes in therapeutic kickboxing and action film-watching.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Sign up to our newsletter

Get the latest privacy news, expert VPN guides & TV unblocking how-to’s sent straight to your inbox.